Lindsay Rae Privette

Lindsay Rae Privette
Assistant Professor of History

B.A., History, Baylor University, 2011
M. A., History, University of Alabama, 2013
Ph.D., History, University of Alabama, 2018

lprivette@andersonuniversity.edu

(864) 231-2445

What classes do you teach at Anderson

American History ; United States History 1; United States History 2; Gilded Age and Progressive Era; Introduction to Public History

What year did you start teaching at AU

2018

Why teach at AU?

College is challenging. It is a period of intense intellectual, emotional, and spiritual growth. Sometimes, there seems to be more questions than answers. I remember those struggles well, and I remember the professors who not only cared about my intellectual development, but my spiritual development as well. I came to Anderson because I want the opportunity to mentor my students in the same way.

Hobbies

I love to read, play the flute, and travel all over the world.

People might be interested to know I...

I have been to all 50 states. My new goal is to visit every continent.

Places you've lived

Vicksburg, MS; Waco, TX; Tuscaloosa, AL

What do you find most enjoyable about working at Anderson University?

I love the people here. The dedication and camaraderie among the faculty and staff is inspiring, and my students are inquisitive and eager.

What I wish prospectives students knew about my discipline or careers in my discipline.

History isn't about memorizing dates! It's about understanding people, and honestly, people haven't changed that much. If you can begin to understand something new about those who lived before us, chances are you'll learn something new about yourself as well.

How would you describe your classes to someone who has never attended one?

I'm a storyteller at heart, but I don't want my students to become passive listeners. Instead I wanted them to participate in the story and evaluate its usefulness.

Publications

“If the Water were Good, We would be Happy: Contaminated Water and Dehydration during the Vicksburg Campaign,” forthcoming in Americans at War: Republicanism, Evangelicalism, Nationalism, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press).

“More than Paper and Ink: Confederate Medical Literature and the Making of the Army Medical Corps,” Civil War History 64, 1 (March 2018): 30-55. 

“’We Yet Survive’: Physician Patient Relationships and the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1853,” Social History of Medicine (October 2017), https://doi.org/10.1093/shm/hkx089.