Robert G. Franklin, Jr.

Robert G. Franklin, Jr.
Assistant Professor of Psychology

Doctorate, Pennsylvania State University, Psychology
MS, Master of Science, Pennsylvania State University, Psychology
BS, Bachelor of Science, College of William and Mary, Psychology

rfranklin@andersonuniversity.edu

(864) 760-1169

What classes do you teach at Anderson

Advanced Research Methods, Cognitive Neuroscience, History and Systems of Psychology, Introduction to Psychology, Statistics I and II

What year did you start teaching at AU

2013

Why teach at AU?

My interest in integrating faith with learning and knowledge led me to pursue a career in Christian higher education. I am passionate about this because it allows me to present a view of psychology that captures the essence of human experience in all its forms, allowing me to discuss and embrace knowledge along with its spiritual implications

How would you describe your classes to someone who has never attended one?

My classes are dynamic and unrestrained by expectations about what a classroom experience should be. Along with traditional lectures, I use discussion, interactive examples and real-world experiences to illustrate concepts and make them relevant to a student’s experience.

Publications

Franklin, R.G. Jr., Nelson, A.J., Baker, M., Beeney, J.E., Lenz-Watson, A., Vescio, T.K., and Adams, R.B. Jr. 2013. Neural mechanisms of empathy for humans and animals. Social Neuroscience 8: 217-227.

Zebrowitz, L.A., Franklin, R.G. Jr., Hillman, S. and Boc, H. 2013. Comparing older and younger adults’ first impressions from faces. Psychology and Aging 28: 202-212.

Franklin, R.G. Jr. and Adams, R.B. Jr. 2011. The reward of a good joke: Neural correlates of viewing dynamic displays of stand-up comedy. Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience 11: 508-515.

Franklin, R.G. Jr. and Adams, R.B. Jr. 2010. What makes a face memorable? The relationship between face memory and emotional state reasoning. Personality and Individual Differences 49: 8-12.

Franklin, R.G. Jr. and Adams, R.B. Jr. 2010. The two halves of beauty: Laterality and the duality of facial attractiveness. Brain and Cognition 72: 300-305.

More About

Enjoys working at AU because “students are eager to work and critically examine the material they learn and the faculty are consistently interested in building deep intellectual relationships with each other and students.”